Press reactions to Ireland & The Eurozone

Well, it appears that there is now a series of options on the table for Ireland after talks continued late into the night – more on that later today – but you’d be hard pressed to find much detail of these discussions in the UK press as the majority of newspapers seem to be rejoicing in the possibility of a cataclysm, including a particularly moronic piece from Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in The Telegraph, full of half-true hindsight and distinctly dodgy future predictions.

What’s interesting is how almost all commentators seem to be foaming at the mouth with glee about the imminent ‘collapse’ of the euro and the european project, ignoring the impact that any potential failure would have on Britain, both politically and economically.

Let’s be blunt, the failure of the Euro would cause a financial firestorm, it would rock markets worldwide, and the blast-wave that would roll over the City of London, and then onto the wider economy of the UK would huge. Just consider there are more Euros traded in London on a weekly basis than exist in the rest of the Eurozone put together: The City contributes 14% of the total tax coffers; a significant proportion of which is earned on Euro investments and trades and the last time I looked this inward trade to the The City alone made the amount that every anti-europe commentator drags up about how much we pay into the EU every year look like pocket change.

Tea Party-esq ramblings from Little Englanders’ are horrifically ignorant. The idea that we are not inextricably linked to Europe in finance and trade and that we’d ‘do just fine’ alone on our little island against the might of China, the USA and Russia (all of whom it should be noted employ protectionist policies whenever it suits) is naive in the extreme.

It’s funny really because the view in the press is not the view I hear in my daily life. I should say I’m not surrounded by europhiles, quite often it’s quite the opposite – but none of the people I meet in my personal and business dealings have the rabid anti-europe sentiment that the press portray the British public as having. That said – one thing is clear: whether we agree with it or not, we will pay to bail out Ireland one way or another – and what’s patently clear is that if we stand by and watch the eurozone fall apart we’ll pay even more dearly than any of the Little Englander’s could ever imagine.

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